Theory of Ruins

"Theory of Ruins", the context of hopeful blues, gives us reasons to move up and on. You have to go somewhere from the darkness, don't you? IS there a place to sit to rest the ruins of your pain? Not just blues, not just a Celtic revival, but a compassionate affair of the two, bringing winds from each territory to dance or fly to.

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Feels Like Coming Home

"Theory of Ruins", the context of hopeful blues, gives us reasons to move up and on. You have to go somewhere from the darkness, don't you? IS there a place to sit to rest the ruins of your pain? Not just blues, not just a Celtic revival, but a compassionate affair of the two, bringing winds from each territory to dance or fly to.

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Blood is Thicker Than Gold

“Blood is thicker than gold” is a kind of “virtuoso fusion.”, a complex blend of Celtic music with that classic American trio of rock, blues, and folk music. What makes it virtuoso, however, is the way he seizes these categories and forges them together in a signature way.

It’s not just a matter of how masterfully he plays the guitar, remarkably so for a debut album, or how weathered his voice sounds (reminiscent of the legendary Leonard Cohen). The difference between an amateur musician and a master may be whether they simply repeat what’s come before or create something new, and Steady does the latter. On one track, he might blaze a folk-infused rock/blues trail that sounds like Pink Floyd spent a year wandering across America (see “The Roamer”, video above). Yet he just might surprise us with Celtic sounds transformed into the meeting place for totally unexpected instrumentals (see “Romulus and Remus”).

Ultimately, there’s a perfect storm in place for Matt Steady’s debut. His mastery of both guitar and his classical training in piano and violin; his synthesis of four distinct styles into one vibrantly personal trademark.

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